Wednesday, October 3, 2018

Drunk on Seismology - Earthquake Petite Sirah



And we flash back to my very first Drunk on Geology post that was over at my The Geology P.A.G.E. website. This was the wine that made me want to start devoting a decent chunk of my time just researching random wines, beers, and other spirits and finding out their geological connections.

The first in our Drunk on Seismology series is Earthquake Petite Sirah by Michael David Winery. This has been and is still one of my favorite geologically related wine bottle designs I have seen. I love the seismogram through the label and how the label is "torn" to highlight the pattern.


To give a little bit of science to this post. An Earthquake is:
a sudden and violent shaking of the ground, sometimes causing great destruction, as a result of movements within the earth's crust or volcanic action.
The shaking produced by the earthquake, causes the back and forth movement of a Seismograph (pictured below).
Image result for seismograph
A seismograph (USGS)

The movement of the seismograph produces the characteristic spiked line that is so often equated with an earthquake. This line pattern, as seen on the front of the Earthquake bottle and in the Drunk on Seismology logo above, is called a Seismogram




Text from the back of the bottle:
"Powerful Titan, arms reaching for sky,Earthbound devourer, open your eyes!
Throw off your blankets, the day has begun,Indulge yourself in warm Lodi sun.
Take what is given, the world is your own,Enjoy your dominion, you sit on the throne.
Stand and be noticed, grape without peer,Instruct in the others what they should fear.
Raise up your standard, proclaim your rights,Answer to no one, conquer with might.
Hail the victor, the king without flaw,Salute your new master ... Petite Sirah."

The best part about the Earthquake wine (in my opinion) is the top of the bottle. They put the seismograph symbol on the top of the cork. Unfortunately that gets destroyed when you open the bottle but you can easily cut that off before uncorking the wine to save it.

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